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Skip Navigation LinksCVMBS Home > Veterinary Teaching Hospital > For Veterinarians > Clinical Trials > Stem Cell Injections for Dogs with Chronic Severe Spinal Cord Injuries
Stem Cell Injections for Dogs with Chronic Severe Spinal Cord Injuries

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Who Qualifies?

Dogs with severe chronic thoracolumbar spinal cord injuries, such as disc herniation or trauma, that have not recovered motor function nor sensation. The dogs must have previously undergone surgical decompression and be at least four weeks post injury.

More Information

The purpose of this study is to assess the clinical outcome in dogs with chronic severe spinal cord injury after transplantation of canine stem cells. The prognosis for functional recovery is grave after four weeks if sensation has not been regained. In vivo studies in a rat model have shown that induced human neural progenitor cells can be administered safely and used to regenerate functional connections across a lesion in spinal cord injuries. Although there have been no studies performed to date in dogs, we hypothesize that canine neural progenitor cells may form connections in dogs with spinal cord injuries.

What is Required?

  • An MRI of the spine to determine site and extent of the lesion and ensure eligibility.
  • Electrodiagnostic evaluation (recording electrical activity across the lesion to objectively assess spinal cord integrity). This will be performed under anesthesia.
  • Stem cell transplant. This is done via a surgical procedure.
  • Reassessment at 4, 12, 24 and 48 weeks.

Benefits:

All costs related to the study will be covered, including the neurological examination, anesthesia, MRI, electrodiagnostic testing, stem cell injections, and all follow-up testing.

To Enroll:

Interested participants can learn more by contacting Dr. Stephanie McGrath; (970) 297-4543 or Stephanie.McGrath@colostate.edu.

Owner consent form for the Stem Cell Injections for Dogs with Chronic Severe Spinal Cord Injuries clinical study