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Hoof Notes

Dr. Mark Stetter

Dr. Mark Stetter becomes dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences in July. He has more than 23 years of experience in veterinary medicine, and joins Colorado State University from the Walt Disney Co., where he was director of animal operations. Dr. Stetter replaces Dr. Lance Perryman, who will complete his tenure as dean in July. Dr. Perryman has been dean of the college since October 2001.
 

Dr. Brian Miller, DVM

The Equine Field Service program is excited to have Dr. Brian Miller as its new ambulatory clinician and program coordinator. Dr. Miller received a BS in animal science from CSU, an MS in reproduction physiology from Kansas State University, and graduated with a DVM from CSU in 2003. Following graduation, Dr. Miller completed an internship in Equine Field Service at CSU. After his internship, he started an ambulatory equine practice in Northern Colorado. During that time, Dr. Miller worked at Texas A&M to receive advanced training in stallion fertility.
 
In 2007, he moved to Iowa and was part of a large-animal practice for three years. In 2009, Dr. Miller and his family moved back to Colorado, where he practiced general equine medicine and also specialized in equine reproduction and embryo transfer. Dr. Miller joined the Equine Field Service team in December 2011. He brings growth and opportunity to this program, and is looking forward to serving patients and the community.
 

Kris Perry, CVT, VTS (Equine Veterinary Nursing)

Kris Perry is one of the equine critical care nurses at the VTH. In December 2011, she completed the course work necessary to earn certification through the American Association of Equine Veterinary Technicians and Assistants AEVNT Equine Certification Program. She is now one of 12 new Academy Specialized Equine Nurses in the nation. Her specialty is Vet Tech-Equine Veterinary Nursing.
 

Celeste Cannon

Celeste Cannon is a new face behind the largeanimal reception desk. Her love of horses started at a young age when she participated in the Westernaires. She followed this passion and graduated from CSU with a bachelor’s degree in equine sciences, and also attended veterinary technician school at Front Range Community College. Her experience includes working as a horse trainer, as a technician for a large-animal veterinarian, and as a small-animal technician, before finding this wonderful position in large-animal reception at CSU. In her spare time, she enjoys mountain and road biking, and spending time with her cats and her fabulous fiancé, Troy.
 

Equine Symposium Raises Money for ERL

The Student Chapter of the American Association of Equine Practitioners hosted a very successful Equine Symposium March 24 and 25 at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Sponsors included Boehringer Ingelheim, Arthrodynamic Technologies, Pfizer Animal Health, Platinum Performance, Merial, Sound-Eklin, and Arenus. The weekend event provided students and veterinarians with both a continuing education opportunity and the chance to network. For this inaugural year, the event served as a fundraiser for the CSU Equine Reproduction Laboratory rebuilding fund. The SCAAEP plans to donate $5,000 to purchase monitors and a computer for the student workspace at the ERL. The group plans to host another event in March 2013. E-mail csuequinesymposium@gmail.com for more information.
 

Resident Updates

Dr. Alexander Daniel, Surgical Resident

Dr. Alexander Daniel recently joined the team at CSU for a three-year surgical residency program. After graduating from the Royal Veterinary College, London, Dr. Daniel spent four years working in a private practice equine referral hospital in California. There, he developed an interest in advanced imaging and has published two papers on MRI of the equine limb. At CSU, Dr. Daniel is continuing his research into the benefits of MRI in horses, and also has a strong interest in alternate biological therapies such as stem cells.
 
Outside of work, he enjoys all forms of exercise and has been preparing for several obstacle course style runs later this year to raise money for breast cancer research.

Dr. Jennifer Hatzel, Equine Theriogenology Resident

Dr. Jennifer Hatzel received her DVM from Western University of Health Sciences in California; and completed an internship at Peterson and Smith Equine Hospital in Florida, and a specialty fellowship in 2009 in Neonatal Intensive Care at Hagyard, Davidson, and McGee Equine Hospital in Kentucky. She then pursued an MS at the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Florida, where she studied equine theriogenology. She has been at CSU’s ERL since June 2011. Her research is focused on evaluation of heat shock protein 10 as the “early pregnancy factor” in mares. She and her husband, Jeremiah, have two dogs (Sedona and Satchel), a kitty (Sphinx), and her longtime equine companion, Winchester.
 

Research Projects

Equine Herpesvirus Type 1

Drs. Gabrielle Landolt and Gisela Hussey are conducting a new research study to unlock how equine herpesvirus type 1 “hides” from the horse’s immune response, causing neurological damage and death. This project will investigate the effect of equine herpesvirus type 1 on the immune system, focusing on the lining of the respiratory system. “If we can crack the equine herpesvirus secret to getting through that gateway and compromising the immune system at that point of entry, we may be better able to find treatments and preventive measures to stop the outbreaks of the virus,” said Dr. Landolt.

Clinical Trial: The Effectiveness of a New Anti-Inflammatory Agent on Clinical Characteristics of Horses with Severe Gastrointestinal Disease

Dr. Diana Hassel is conducting this clinical trial for adult horses (less than 1 year old) that have surgical disease of the gastrointestinal tract or diarrhea. The study will characterize the efficacy of phenylmethimazole, a novel and potent anti-inflammatory agent, in reducing signs of endotoxemia and inflammation (high heart rate, pain, reddened mucous membranes, fever) in horses with severe colic or colitis (diarrhea).