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Miki the Cat

The Miki Society for Companion Animal Research offers an opportunity to memorialize pets by contributing to research that helps all companion animals. The Miki Society was created in 1988 as a memorial to the first cat in the world, Miki, to receive a bone marrow transplant for a rare and fatal disease found in both cats and children. The disease, mucoploysaccaridosis (MIPS) VI, is a devastating terminal illness affecting the very young. Miki died three years after his transplant, becoming the longest surviving cat with MIPS. His spirit lives on in support of pioneering medical research that seeks to improve animal and human health through on-going research.

The Miki Society Giving Stories

BeBe Kahus

BeBe Kahus

BeBe was a lively Sharpei who was as happy lounging on the couch as she was tracking down critters in the wilds of rural Arizona. Unfortunately, BeBe's exuberant life was cut tragically short by Sharpei fever – a serious genetic condition that can end in liver or kidney failure.  BeBe's veterinarian and her family both made contributions to the Miki Society to support research into conditions such as Sharpei fever, about which relatively little is currently known. Research into hereditary canine illness like Sharpei fever promises not only to improve the prognosis for companion animals like BeBe, but also to provide insight into similar diseases that afflict people.

 
Laddie Hockom

Laddie Hockom

Laddie could light up a room with his sweet, silly personality. When he passed away at the age of 12 from kidney problems and pneumonia, the Hockoms made a gift in his memory toward canine research at the Miki Society for Companion Animals. Through this fund, clinicians and scientists receive financial support to research improved treatment options for dogs experiencing similar health problems.

 

Moki and Taz

Moki and Taz

Moki and Taz were best friends, sharing a bond as special as any two companions could enjoy. Their love for each other lit up the lives of their people. Moki's family adopted her at 11 weeks old, just one week after their friends and neighbors adopted Taz. The dogs were inseparable for the next 10 1/2 years, sharing two families, two homes, and countless fishing, camping, and traveling adventures. Their families recognized the poetic tragedy of the dogs’ passing within two months of each other, each from a different form of aggressive cancer. Their families made a contribution to the Miki Society in recognition of their inseparable friendship. 

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