Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
Skip Navigation LinksCVMBS Home > Academics > Microbiology, Immunology & Pathology Home > MIP Research > Perera Lab: Viral Pathogenesis and Cellular Metabolism
Rushika Perera laboratory members

 Back row (left to right): Dr. Rushika Perera, Irma Sanchez-Vargus, Nunya Chotiwan. Front row (left to right): Jordan Steel, Katherine Menning, Eleanor Howe, Rebekah Gullberg.

Perera Lab: Viral Pathogenesis and Cellular Metabolism

 

 Resources

 
 

 Contact

 

Dr. ​Rushika Perera
114 AIDL
Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences
Colorado State University
Phone: (970) 491-8611
Email: Rushika.Perera@colostate.edu

​Research Focus

The research of Dr. Rushika Perera's laboratory is focused on understanding the impact of cellular metabolism on the replication of mosquito- and tick-borne flaviviruses within their vertebrate hosts and Arthropod vectors. Specifically, we use a systems biology approach including metabolomics and proteomics combined with molecular virology, cell biology, biochemistry and structural biology to study flavivirus-host interactions. Similar to other positive strand RNA viruses, flaviviruses cause significant perturbations to the host metabolome to facilitate the formation of replication factories within specialized membrane structures. These structures are required for viral genome replication, assembly and egress. The host metabolome also fulfills the energy requirements for virus replication. Therefore, it is a key avenue to understand the dynamics of virus-host interactions and provides a novel avenue to identify targets for antiviral intervention. The goal of my research is to identify control points in cellular metabolic pathways that are required for virus replication, and evaluate these control points as novel targets for antiviral intervention.

News

mosquito

Have you heard the buzz? Rushika Perera was named a Boettcher Investigator and received funding to support her research in mosquito-borne viruses. She studies biochemical changes in the mosquito midgut that allow virus replication.

​Researchers have identified enzymes and biochemical compounds called lipids that are targeted and modified by the dengue virus during infection, suggesting a potential new approach to control the aggressive mosquito-borne pathogen.

​Researchers have identified enzymes and biochemical compounds called lipids that are targeted and modified by the dengue virus during infection, suggesting a potential new approach to control the aggressive mosquito-borne pathogen.

Researchers have discovered a potential treatment for a viral infection that causes potentially fatal brain swelling and paralysis in children. The findings also point to possible treatments for related viruses including those that cause "common cold" symptoms.

​Researchers have discovered critical new details about the structure of a virus that causes potentially fatal brain swelling and paralysis in children, pointing toward designs for antiviral drugs to treat the disease.

​Researchers have discovered a potential treatment for a viral infection that causes potentially fatal brain swelling and paralysis in children. The findings also point to possible treatments for related viruses including those that cause "common cold" symptoms.

make a gift
Contact Us:
1682 Campus Delivery
Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1682

Phone:
(970) 491-6144

Fax:
(970) 491-0603